About

ABOUT US

The National Council of Negro Women, Inc. (NCNW) is a nonprofit membership organization comprised of 36 national African American women’s organizations and more than 230 community and campus based sections.  NCNW’s mission is to lead, empower  and advocate for nearly three million women , their  families and communities. We seek to harness the collective power of women of African descent, so that they may realize their full potential and create a just society that enhances the quality of life for all people.

Four for the Future:

Education, Health, Entrepreneurship and Values drive NCNW’s initiatives. NCNW serves as a catalyst for effective action to address disparities and inequities in communities of color through research, service and advocacy. We fulfill our mission through national and community-based health, education and economic empowerment services and programs undertaken by our section and affiliate volunteers in 31 states.

NCNW addresses local needs while impacting communities nationwide. NCNW’S programs promote civic engagement, empower voters,  educate business owners, prevent HIV/AIDS, tutor and mentor youth and young adults, close the digital divide and  STEM gaps, encourage healthy lifestyles, promote traditional values and serve seniors and disadvantaged youth.

"Today The National Council of Negro Women, Inc. (NCNW) is a Council of 36 affiliated national African American women's organizations and over 240 sections – with an outreach to nearly 4 million women worldwide!"
"Since our founding, NCNW has focused on fulfilling our mission by launching programs that provide critical services to women, children and families. Even a brief sampling of our programs and partnerships illustrates the breadth and depth of our program offerings."

History

Extraordinary educator and political leader Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) founded NCNW in 1935 as an “organization of organizations”  to represent national and international concerns of Black women. NCNW fought for jobs, the right to vote and anti-lynching legislation. It gave Black women the opportunity to realize their goals for social justice and human rights through united, constructive action. The legendary Dr. Dorothy Irene Height led NCNW for decades, securing its legacy of enlightened leadership and influence

Eleanor_Roosevelt_receiving_the_Mary_McLeod_Bethune_Human_Rights_Award_from_Dorothy_Height,_president_of_the_National..._-_NARA_-_196283Our Mission

Our mission is to lead, develop and advocate for women of African descent as they support their families and communities. We seek to harness the collective power of women of African descent, so that they may realize their full potential.  To create a just society in which the quality of life is enhanced for all people. We fulfill our mission through research, advocacy and national and community-based health, education and economic empowerment services and programs in the United States and Africa. Through section and affiliate volunteers in 31 states, NCNW addresses local needs while impacting communities nationwide.

NCNW translates its philosophy of public education, service and advocacy into activities designed to promote a number of benefits to our women, families and communities. NCNW acts as a central source for program planning and seeks to fill the gaps that exist in our communities.

  • Disseminating information about issues affecting African American women and their families.
  • Promoting healthy lifestyles and behaviors through wellness projects.
  • Sponsoring events such as The Black Family Reunion Celebration to build on our strengths and traditional values.
  • Training and supporting women and youth in career development and community leadership.
  • Supporting economic development and entrepreneurship.
  • Providing mentoring and educational support to our young people.

 

National Headquarters

NCNW Is based in the historic Dorothy Height Building, 633 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC, strategically located between the White House and the U. S. Capitol.

We also have two field offices around the country. The national headquarters acts as a central nexus for its affiliated organizations and sections.